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« Some Promising Signs for the Economy and the Equity Market | Main | ETF Update: On the Couch with Dr. Brett »

July 18, 2009

Comments

Mike

I still hold out some hope for Charlie Gibson. At least I feel comfortable "inviting him into our home" as we used to say. Was it Arthur Godfrey that coined that phrase?

heywally

"There no longer seems to be a market for objective, non-partisan analysts. Those invited on TV are encouraged to have a controversial viewpoint. "

It's SO bad now. TV 'news' has devolved to an arena of screaming banshees, the main intent to sell advertising with over-simplistic and emotional viewpoints.

I'm 57 and as a young man, could watch the news which back then, was just someone reading it, as sugar-coated as it sometimes was. I can't watch anymore and that included CNBC.

karen walker

Well said, Jeff. Although I respect Cronkite's efforts to be objective in the early years, I think most viewers knew his political leanings long before he spoke out on Vietnam.

On election night in 1960, he was visibly crestfallen when he reported that it appeared Nixon would win. I thought I even saw tears in his eyes then, and again later when the Chicago cemetery precincts came in and he giddily reported that Kennedy had won. I was only nine years old at the time, but I remember thinking that the "TV Man" really shouldn't be taking sides.

I wish he had waited until he left the news desk to share his other political opinions, but for most of his career, he seemed to understand the power of his position and the importance of maintaining journalistic integrity. It's too bad that today's spincasters have no respect for the example he tried to set.

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