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« Do You Adjust Your Price Targets? | Main | Weighing the Week Ahead: Can Job Growth be Improved? »

March 28, 2012

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Comments

Angel Martin

Jeff, I agree with your key questions. Those are basically the top ones that come to mind for me as well.

What I would ask in addition is the following:

What do you consider to be a big source of financial or economic risk that is not widely recognized?

I would suggest that, since you have a very diverse group of people at the Kaufmann conference, that produce proprietary intellectual content and they are innovative thinkers, I think that collectively they have the potential to identify some "tail risks" that the rest of us should consider.

I would be very interested in seeing their list of "underrated risks".

also, on the same line, you could ask them what economic and financial situations have an underrated upside.

David Dean

With all the posturing about the ever increasing cost of gasoline, why don't the politicians get to the root of the problem and that would be speculation in commodity market. There are rules on the books. Why do the powers that be ignore them? Is it the big money interests that subvert the solutions because they are making a killing at the expense of the driving public? This speculation is adding 30 to 40 percent to the cost of a barrel of oil.(some will say only 15%,but it is still too much) Is it to difficult for the media and politicians to explain how to stop this?

Proteus

Jeff, I'd rather have a carefully thought-out analysis posted next week, compared to a hasty summary this afternoon. The world is not going to end in the next 30 seconds.

As for topics, almost anything from Econbrowser (or even Bruce Krasting) from this year sounds good to me - and you could rank them by the number of comments.

57andrew

I always struggle with the interlnkages and correlation risk. Nowadays it seems increasingly as if we have one market that moves around the time zones. Yet I don't see the coordinated response that ought to be in everybody's interests. I hear an awful lot of doom mongering and this has a propensity to be self fulfilling. What will it take to restore confidence which will itself drive some degree of recovery. Or is the best case scenario a long grinding muddle through?

derek

Why do administrations going back 40 years(!) cave to big oil? Lobby money? We could so easily convert big rig trucking to cheap, cleaner, home-grown liquid nat. gas. It's such a no-brainer it boggles the mind. So many American families destroyed from oil-based foreign wars, so many terrorists born daily because we occupy their lands.
We could quickly build the infrastructure for the major freeways in 3 months, resulting in a game-changer for the U.S. economy. We have the technology.
Why do you think Americans are so cynical about their congress people? The growing consensus is they could give a crap about the country, it's children, it's future. All about getting pig-rich with lobbyist cash.

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