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« Weighing the Week Ahead: Will the modest economic rebound continue? | Main | FOMC Preview: Bernanke's Third Press Conference »

October 31, 2011

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Comments

oldprof

Alex -- This is a good question. Many analysts set a target and then move it when it is hit. This is not very helpful. If you really thought the stock had very little upside left, you might sell sooner.

I regularly review the fundamentals (and price target) of every stock. If the business remains strong and the earnings growth continues, the price target will move higher.

AAPL is a good example. The earnings growth has been so strong that I have raised my target many times.

Thanks for the helpful question.

Jeff

oldprof

pacioli -- I'm glad you enjoyed it, and thanks for taking the time to write.

I often have no idea what people will like, so feedback is helpful.

Jeff

oldprof

Thanks, Bill!

Alex H

You've mentioned in previous posts you have a $100 price target on JPM. If in a couple years JPM hits your $100 target, and your analysis still leads you to a $100 price, do you immediately sell there? The reason I ask is because it seems like many times, stocks that are on a run go significantly higher. On the other hand there are many that never meet price targets in a realistic time frame.

pacioli

This is your best post in LONG time! Thanks!

bill

The mix of big picture issues (Europe negotiations, employment stats issues, etc) and simple advice like this make Dash something I look forward to reading.

I also appreciate your data-focused approach over the usual hyped viewpoints by those just trying to score personal points.

Bill

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