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« CDO's and the Market: An Investor Guide | Main | Payroll Employment Report »

July 02, 2007

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Bill a.k.a. NO DooDahs

Extreme breadth of market participation could imply that traders are chasing any and all stocks, including those of companies with poor fundamentals, transforming an index where all members are rising into a "bull trap."

Therefore, limited participation could imply that only the strongest sectors and companies are leading, which is as it should be, hypothetically.

Of course, one needs a comprehensive analysis to determine whether market breadth means anything in this context.

muckdog

Hey, what if you just buy at the bottoms and sell at the tops? How does that work?

;)

The argument of using a market-cap ETF vs a non-market-cap ETF goes on. Whatever is most popular will probably be the underperformer going forward!

What we need is a working crystal ball. I keep searching EBAY for one. They're very rare and somebody keeps putting in a bid $1 higher than mine at the last minute and I lose out...

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