My Photo
Note: Jeff does not accept guest blog posts on A Dash of Insight.

For inquiries regarding advertising and republication, contact main@newarc.com

Follow Jeff on Twitter!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Certifications

  • Seeking Alpha
    Seeking Alpha Certified
  • AllTopSites
    Alltop, all the top stories
  • iStockAnalyst
Talk Markets
Forexpros Contributor
Disclaimer
Copyright 2005-2014
All Rights Reserved

« Rethinking the Presidential Election Cycle | Main | Energy Independence? Corn, More Corn »

January 22, 2007

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451ddb269e200d834db9ae753ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Earnings Season Getting Underway:

Comments

Bill aka NO DooDahs!

How about this: who really gives a darn about how the companies in the mutual fund known as the S&P 500 do during earnings season? Why does it matter about the implications for "the economy" - which, for the benefit of those with an economist's miseducation, is not the same as the G-D-P.

What really matters is that over the course of the next several weeks, most of the publicly traded U.S. stocks will report earnings, and earnings are often a catalyst for growth in share price. The propeller-heads write papers about "inefficient transmission of information" or "earnings underreaction" but some traders know that earnings season is to be looked forward to as a huge buffet at a new Chinese restaurant should be - sure, some of the dishes will taste bad, if you sample small portions, you'll adequately control your risk.

Embrace earnings season!

Paul Meisel

There is a lot more heat than light in earnings season commentary. It reminds me of my wife and daughter watching E! -- there may be nothing to talk about but we have to talk anyway............

Bill aka NO DooDahs!

To some analysts, the only question that matters is "how can I spin this data bearishly?"

Barry Ritholtz

We are looking to identify when there is a change in performance relative to expectations. The raw numbers do not matter, but rather, the change is what is significant.

To investors, the question that matters is this: "Are more companies beating than in the past, or are less?"


The comments to this entry are closed.